Tag Archives: Vintage Design

Design Inspiration: Package Design

I don’t know about anyone else, but I’m a sucker for cool package design. I’ll admit it. I desire to buy things I don’t really need because the package design is so sweet. Give me a shinny new aluminum bottle Diet Coke and I’m more than willing to pay the extra dollar (yes… I kept that bottle…shamelessly). For those of you who are also lovers of all things well designed I’ve created an inspirational list for you to feast your eyes on.

Some of these sites you may need to dig around on to find actual label and brand design, some repeat depending on the links you click within the sites, and some are simply focused on various forms of packaging (basic boxes, folding, and layouts because you can’t have the look without work).

Masters of Label and Package Design (and just some sites with inspiration) 



Design Inspiration: Masters of Book Design

I don’t know about anyone else, but I often do judge books by their covers. Literally. It’s the story you encounter before the story ever begins. I’ve been notorious for buying attractive (I was going to say “sexy” but thought you may think I was taking it a bit too far) books regardless of their content. Why not right?

Anyway, book design is a large part of daily graphic design encounters. Speaking as an avid reader, I’d rather have my eyes rest on a beautiful design rather than an eyesore. Otherwise it’s like dragging nails across a chalkboard, but with your eyes….yeah…something like that.

Here is a list of sites to help inspire your inner book drunkard and designer.

Master Book Designers

Salamander Hill Design

Peter Mendelsund

Chip Kidd

John Gall

Henry Sene Yee

Tobias Design


Design Inspiration: Masters of the Poster

Product of Hammerpress

We’re all very familiar with designing posters. If you’ve ever been in a school club, walked down a street, been in a band, whatever else you may be involved with, you’ve probably had to make or have seen at least one poster in your life. If you haven’t you may want to reconsider what kind of design school you’re going to (if you’re not a design student and you haven’t seen a poster in your life, you’re not on the right planet). Like sliced bread, Poster Design is a staple. One of the most common and basic forms of design. Flat canvas of color, text, and imagery all conveying a message. For some of us, our best and first projects are poster designs, but in comparison to some, we are only children on computers or in front of sketch books with pencils in our hands and dreams on our sleeves.

Here is a list of Poster Design Masters to help inspire you.

The Poster Design Masters:

Design Resources: Paper

I love the smell of new paper. When it comes to Printing what you want, you’ll need the right kind of paper. Basic right? Here is a list of sites you can order any and every kind of paper you can imagine. Now the only problem is choosing what kind you want…

Paper

Paper Specs

International Paper

Neenah Paper

Domtar Paper

French Paper

Mohawk Paper

Sappi

Appleton Coated


The Golden Ratio

 

I’ll admit, I’m not a huge number person. If there is anything in life I don’t understand easily it’s numbers. However, one thing I cannot deny (as much as I would like to) is that numbers are an essential part of design. This is because there are biological and mathematical reasons why certain things in nature are considered beautiful. It’s known by many names, but here I shall call it the Golden Ratio. It shows up in everything, poster designs, sea shells, architecture, the human body, DNA and art across the ages. It’s considered one of the most perfect numerical values in the world because of its consistency in nature and its correlation to beauty. Here is a short film about this amazing number, that though small, captivates minds of numerically, musically and visually oriented persons alike.

 


Wise Words from Wim Crouwel…

Wim Crouwel. Not many people would know this name unless they were avid Graphic Design junkies. The kind of people who dig up information while trying to come up with the newest and freshets ideas at 2 AM in their studios or basements. In brief, Crouwel is a Dutch graphic designer and typographer who’s work reshaped and fiercely influenced much of the way graphic design is done today. His achievements for the artistic community include (but are not limited to) the development of 3 major typefaces: New Alphabet, Fodor, and Gridnik.

I felt these words were wise for many aspiring graphic designers to hear. In a time where technology  makes you want to sit and start right away, designer Wim Crouwel reminds us that it’s okay to be a designer who sits and ponders a design. It resonated with me, because my professor in college always reminded us “Begin with the end in mind, so you don’t lose your way.” As designers we deal with the difficult task of having to work in a fast paced society. You’re in a place where you have to print out the newest and freshest idea before someone else gets to it. Here Crouwel tells us about the sitting and waiting for inspiration aspect, an aspect we sometimes ignore or forget is important because of the stress of everyday life… and then wonder why we can’t creatively work.

Besides those wise words, he gives us a brief history of his life and how it was working in the 40’s and 50’s in the graphic design field. He talks nostalgically  about how influenced you are by the time in which you are born, and how it can become so much a part of you as you grow…it eventually becomes your trademark. As I reflect on this interview I’m reminded to let inspiration come in it’s own time and let the time I live in lead me, not push me.