Category Archives: Social Networking

It’s Worth a Moment of Your Time…

Screen Shot 2014-12-22 at 7.44.47 PMIn my short lived ventures around the internet, I found this little gem which provides a positive insight into the use of social networking and technology. A breath of fresh air in a world who is so afraid of that which is new, different, or puts us in a state of vulnerability.

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Turning The World….

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I read a quote on Ello the other day that one of the writers I follow posted. I’m not sure if it was one of her own or from another source, but I found myself wondering about it a great deal.

“Many people, especially in technology say their productivity is changing the world, and this is irrefutable. But no one seems to know what they’re changing it into.”

Many commenters posted their thoughts, and much of it was about technology it’s self. I couldn’t understand that. Technology it’s self doesn’t have fully functioning rational consciousness…yet. So why is so much being said about technology when there are minds behind it? I decided to put my two cents in and commented:

This is precisely the point I had been trying to make in my computer ethics blog in college, and why I personally believe in the “design for good” movement. I think the use of technology and how to cause change in the world stems from the individual user and their choice, not necessarily the creator of said technology. Though I think the creator is the one who gets the ball rolling, it is the users who manipulate the technology’s usefulness and influence one another. Though, that is more or less dependent on the situation. Without context I get the implication that the quote speaks more on the unpredictability of the technology user to change the world and not necessarily the technology it’s self.

I think when it comes to technology we are too willing to blame situations on the device. Too often I hear parents ridicule their children about phone and computer use, but in the context of the technology. “I should get rid of that damn computer…” Kind of commentary is often times too common, but what it does is dissociates the user from the responsibility. It is not the computers fault that the individual spends so much time on it. It is the choice of the user to spend time on it, and in this particular case, it was someone’s failure to set appropriate boundaries for such use. Weather it be the parent or the child is another story entirely.

To take away the computer is far too extreme. It is useful. It is necessary as well. Technology use causes the world to turn. Most of our educational and work environments require the use of a computer for nearly everything now. Perhaps another case of people’s failure to set boundaries? Feel free to put your thoughts on that in comments below.

I must put a disclaimer as well. There are some technologies that are changing the world for very specific reasons. The above commentary I made speaks more on programs, games, social networks, internet use, apps etc. More socially oriented technology. There are technologies that are made for specific uses, like medical technology, where the goal is to change the medical field for whatever reason, and usually with a passionate cause and predicted out come. In those situations, the use of technology is entirely dependent on the proper functionality if the technology as well as the user, and the outcome is usually predictable because it is being made for a specific goal. That may seem obvious to mention, but I would rather mention it since occasionally, the technology has other outcomes as well that develop into another kind of technology altogether. Much of our popularly used tech was developed from military tech made public once it was found to have a variety of uses.

What are your thoughts on technology development and the quote above? I would love to hear perspectives.


The Newest in Social Networking

Scrolling through my social networks, I can’t help but notice all the ad space, feed interuptions, and clutter. In the modern age we really ought to be streamlining our information right? I mean, what kind of social space really needs advertisements when all I want to know is what’s up with my buds from college?

Now, I’m a big fan of Google+ for is clean and easy scan quality, as well as it’s ability to help me organize who sees what when I post it. I also am a fan of Twitter for that quick sound bite style of info and status sharing, because it’s effortless, and reduces the information to its most concise parts. But, when it comes to Facebook, I’m starting to feel like the issues I had with MySpace are rearing their ugly heads. There is too much. Too much clutter. Too much text. Too much visually happening. Too many people to keep track of posting too many things I don’t care about that I can’t really skim through. Too much to share. Too much to like. All in an unorganized blocky fashion. I desire that clean streamline design for better consumer scanning. I want effortless user interface, where it runs so smoothly that it is as easy the first time as it is years after I have used it.

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Recently, I found out about another social media site called Ello. What intrigued me about Ello, is it’s manifesto to offer you a social space that is beautifully minimalist, while also giving you AD FREE SERVICE. You read that right. Ad free. Because they are not owned by advertisers. They don’t get profit from kickbacks. They don’t want to sell out. It’s kind of the hipster equivalent of social networking.

But will it work? That depends on the community it brings.

I’m interested to see where it goes.


Eavesdropping

No this isn’t a post about Big Brother or anything like that (sorry to disappoint). It’s either a larger or smaller scale issue than that depending on your perspective.

I often kept a quote book in college. Yeah I’m a nerd. But most conversations I took the quotes from were ones I was having with others, and they never went outside of the lines pages of my grungy personal journal…unless it happened in a yearbook meeting (yeah, I was also a yearbook nerd get over it). Now that I look back a those pages, I almost wish I had made them into a blog or something (more people would probably read that than a computer ethic blog). But then again, a few things have come across my iPad screen that have caused me to think again about those feelings.

There are a few Instagram sites that have come to my attention recently that offer bits of conversations overheard in public places as featured entertainment. A kind of quote book, but much more public. Now I follow the one that I am going to share with you from an article on Design Taxi I read and it is pretty funny. Human conversations are often odd to eavesdrop on. But I was contemplating the ethics of such behavior. Do you think it is ethical to post pieces of “out of context” conversations for entertainment? Even if the person isn’t aware you’re going to do it?

Think about it. Most of what you say, you think is pretty secure. People assume no one is paying attention to the things they say in public places because their agendas are their own, but if we look deeper into the matter, perhaps we are a little too quick to enjoy what seems to be entertainment, when in actuality it is a kind of invasion of privacy.

But then again, if NSA does it, why can’t we?

I consider it this way even…is this not only a privacy issue, but also an intellectual property issue. If the words are not your own, does the person saying them have intellectual property or do you for publishing them as “original works” against the terms of agreement on Instagram? Mind you, not everyone posts original work as they ought to, but that in and of its self is an issue of privacy. Or further, is this a form of online bullying? Perhaps the work isn’t considered harmful or wasn’t posted to be intentionally so, but some of the things posted are going to receive backlash of some kind or another right? The “curator” isn’t going to have complete control over what viewers comment or say, or even if they do, they may not be able to keep up with the volume of comments to regulate what is actually being said that could potentially be harmful.

Perhaps I’m over thinking this?

Thoughts?


Women, Technology, and Freethinking

I just finished reading a fascinating article about how sexism has been an issue within the athiest movement. It’s a controversial subject, not only because it speaks against world religion, but also because it talks about issues women have had with technology use and how quickly and devastatingly it leads to harassment and threats towards other human beings on the grouds of gender and/or sexual orientation.

 

I am am not personally an athiest, but I wanted to share this article on the basis of computer ethics. It describes how hotstile the online world is towards people who are passionate about their beliefs, and how that can fuel the fire and bleed outside of the virtual world into our physical lives. Basically, it talks about one of the most mainstream forms of bullying. You know, the adult kind of bullying, where police can get involved and entire movements can be formed or brought down and either help or hinder entire people groups. It also describes some of the ugly of wester culture, which is also controversial. To to be a culture of innovation, sometimes we have to let go of the old ideas and build towards something newer and better.

This article is littered with graphic descriptions of “alleged” events, lots of swearing, and hints of the use of technology as a means of harassment as well as a means for change. Click here to read the article “Will Misogyny Bring Down The Atheist Movement?:
The continuing debate over a murky sexual encounter at a 2008 convention for cheekily anti-establishment skeptics underscores a broader dilemma: How can a progressive, important intellectual community behave so poorly towards its female peers?”


Saving Net Neutrality…Hello Again Readers

 

So I haven’t been posting for a while now, mainly because I am way too busy being a corporate sellout adult with a real world job that sucks my soul away.

So let’s carry on like nothing ever happened and pretend we aren’t upset about the whole ordeal. Let’s talk about Net Neutrality a little bit. It sounds intellectual and stuff and whatever.

So I haven’t been paying attention to online issues lately, mainly because I struggle with the issue of skewed journalism, and am not entirely sure what is correct an incorrect information. All I know is one day as I scrolled through my newly opened Google+ account I ran into this little jewel.image

What has happened to my wonderful, free speech and equal opportunity internet?

Slowly (because of working a “part-time” job of 40 hrs a week mostly late into the night), I began to try to figure out what all this crap was about. Granted, most of the action happened in January of 2014, while I was still busy working post-holiday damage control in retail. But, I was just hearing about this now? Why? Was the internet turning against me already, trying to keep me from seeing what matters? Was I just being paranoid? Was I under a rock?

Probably all the above.

It doesn’t surprise me though. People online have been looking to make more and more money off the internet since it’s explosive popularity some 20+ years ago. It is not even a little surprising that it was under attack again, trying to limit the freedoms of its users and offer unequal opportunity to those with the deepest pockets. But what did that mean for me? What does that mean for the fate of the internet?

So what did I do upon coming out of my internet cave with the sun glaring in my eyes? I turned to savetheinternet.com.

For those of you just as confused about what all this Net Neutrality stuff is about, I found this site to be extremely helpful. One, because it really gets down to what this could mean negatively for the typical user. Secondly, it helps streamline the basics and keeps us up-to-date on what court rulings mean. For starters, I wanted to know what Net Neutrality actually described:

“Net Neutrality means an Internet that enables and protects free speech. It means that Internet service providers should provide us with open networks — and should not block or discriminate against any applications or content that ride over those networks. Just as your phone company cannot decide who you could call and what you say on that call, your ISP should not be concerned with what content you view or post online.”

So for avid (and lazy corporate sellout) bloggers like us (me), this can be a threatening issue. A threat to Net Neutrality could mean that Companies (specifically Internet Service Providers) can buy better internet accessibility and have sole control over that online traffic. They can choose who sees what. They can see what you see and keep track of it without any protection on your part. It threatens small online markets for building networks and clientele. It even can prevent minority communities from freely expressing cultural issues and building networks online.

Really it is a threat to freedom.

The truth is, we don’t know for sure what it could actually look like. The programs wouldn’t be made overnight, but that didn’t mean any change would happen gradually. It would take time to develop the servers and prep them for the segregation. That is what it would be after all. Online segregation. Just like the rest of American History, inequality was going to find another platform to present itself and rear it’s ugly head threateningly. Except, it would become a socioeconomic segregation. The well-off would win out against the not-so-well-off. A struggle that has been an issue in the United States for ages as well.

For more information on this issue and a better in-depth idea of how it might affect you, please visit savetheinternet.com and also feel free to sign the online petition provided by Etsy.com for protecting Net Neutrality and small online markets.


pantone fall 2014 report

Color is often determined by common fashion trends. The 2014 report is now out and available for all your design needs. I’m gunna go throw some confetti, drink a ton of coffee, and study it like a motherboarding text book.

dry ink designs

Well, it’s officially out – the Pantone Fall 2014 report!

pantone 2014 fall report

 

Click here for the full report!

 

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