Tag Archives: Students

The Newest in Social Networking

Scrolling through my social networks, I can’t help but notice all the ad space, feed interuptions, and clutter. In the modern age we really ought to be streamlining our information right? I mean, what kind of social space really needs advertisements when all I want to know is what’s up with my buds from college?

Now, I’m a big fan of Google+ for is clean and easy scan quality, as well as it’s ability to help me organize who sees what when I post it. I also am a fan of Twitter for that quick sound bite style of info and status sharing, because it’s effortless, and reduces the information to its most concise parts. But, when it comes to Facebook, I’m starting to feel like the issues I had with MySpace are rearing their ugly heads. There is too much. Too much clutter. Too much text. Too much visually happening. Too many people to keep track of posting too many things I don’t care about that I can’t really skim through. Too much to share. Too much to like. All in an unorganized blocky fashion. I desire that clean streamline design for better consumer scanning. I want effortless user interface, where it runs so smoothly that it is as easy the first time as it is years after I have used it.

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Recently, I found out about another social media site called Ello. What intrigued me about Ello, is it’s manifesto to offer you a social space that is beautifully minimalist, while also giving you AD FREE SERVICE. You read that right. Ad free. Because they are not owned by advertisers. They don’t get profit from kickbacks. They don’t want to sell out. It’s kind of the hipster equivalent of social networking.

But will it work? That depends on the community it brings.

I’m interested to see where it goes.


pantone fall 2014 report

cybergothpandas:

Color is often determined by common fashion trends. The 2014 report is now out and available for all your design needs. I’m gunna go throw some confetti, drink a ton of coffee, and study it like a motherboarding text book.

Originally posted on dry ink designs:

Well, it’s officially out – the Pantone Fall 2014 report!

pantone 2014 fall report

 

Click here for the full report!

 

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Robots with Soul


#HistoryOfHashtags

I am amazed at how many people in my millennialist generation do not actually know how to use the common #hashtag. For those of you who know what the #hashtag is, you are well aware of the delight of feedback it offers to you when you use social networking such as Twitter, Instagram, and now Facebook (much to their users chagrin). For those of you who are not familiar with the #hashtag I have found this somewhat boring video that is a visual understanding of the #hashtag:

If you are less visual and more musical, here is a catchy, cheesy, and friggin nerdy little ditty about the history of #hashtag:

I certainly hope you are sitting embarrassed in your office, school, or home because some geek with a trombone just sang to you about #hashtags. It brings me great joy to think so.

There are ways to use #hashtags to build a campaign or brand online as well. Many sites offer the ability to see how popular certain #hashtags to group info relevant to an advertising campaign or certain entertainers on social media. Sites like HashtagIg.com  show you how many photos have a particular #hashtag as well as the top trending on Instagram. Another similar site is HashAtIt.com helps you search certain #hashtag conversations online to follow and you can refine your search by social network. Twitter offers you trending #hashtags on the left sidebar of your account admin homepage while also making it easy to find conversations similar to those you have already tagged in their “#Discover” navigation on the top left.

#Hashtags are important to help you build a Follower base, it is important to choose your #hashtags accurately and wisely. Here is a great visual provided by Twitter to help you choose a #hashtag for your comments, statuses, and images:


You Can’t Fix Cyber-Stupid

Screen Shot 2013-12-03 at 8.36.55 PMAs a fair trade black coffee and tea loving, TOM’s shoe wearing Causegear fan (I sound like a hipster…get over it)…I am an avid follower on Upworthy.com, and in being an avid follower on such an ingenious site, I find myself running into a lot of interesting and new ideas, perspectives, and even life changing information . Today on my Facebook news feed (and yes I follow Upworthy on Facebook….and Twitter…and you should too because it’ll make you an informed boss of internet wonder), I had this video article come across my screen. I suggest a quick watch.

http://www.upworthy.com/some-creepy-dudes-wrote-some-creepy-things-to-this-scientist-so-she-is-calling-them-out-in-public

Now that I can safely assume you’ve watched the entire video. So we have an interesting problem on our hands, the world appears to be getting dumber and more distasteful. Women are targets on the internet, and we hear this time and time again to the point where we shrug it off much like Emily did when asked about cyber-sexism. We’re used to it. It’s become normal to see women and men alike being negatively admired.

Wait. Negatively admired?

Yes.

Online we often feel as though we have the safety net of a screen to protect us from the repercussions of our words and actions. As you saw in the video Emily, puts up with a great deal of sexism in her field, which is both sad and unacceptable as her work is wonderfully presented and she takes a great deal of time out of her busy life to ensure the quality of her work. However, she still deals with uncouth comments that are irrelevant to her work, not that they are trying to be insensitive or hurtful, they probably genuinely mean what they say and think it’s actually flattering. But they are admiring her for things she does not represent. She isn’t a sex object, she is an educated woman who works professionally towards a future of brilliant minds and new discoveries.

The issue isn’t that she feels threatened by these comments and it’s not even sexism that I really want to touch on (though a subject I will save for another time, because the internet has a lot of it), but rather something as simple as comments on a post could be the possible prevention of brilliant minds coming to light and helping save our world. We live in a world that is spiraling downward and rocketing upward at an alarming and erratic pace, and with each new idea we see there are millions of others who are finding new and better ways to do the same thing…and new and better ways to pervert those ideas.

What am I getting at?

The reason we need to take our time considering what we say online is because there are people on the other end of those comments that those very comments are about. Those words weigh heavily on minds burdened by so many thoughts. The brilliant aren’t always the brave (it is a burden being so intelligent). Besides, your comments are not anonymous. There is always someone watching them. If I felt threatened enough at any time by one of my commenters, I could easily get in touch with law enforcement, who can then contact the web administrators to look up the personal information of any username and IP address and find the heckler. Or I can contact a web administrator myself through a “contact us” or a “report abuse” link. On my personal Instagram I’m constantly deleting, blocking and reporting people for their comments (daily if not hourly) and I hardly put up a selfie.

This isn’t so much a post about an issue we aren’t familiar with, but a reminder that the internet is compiled of humans who are not as emotionless as the desktop or tablet beneath your fingertips. Be responsible. Smh.

 

 

 

 

 


I can’t say I’m any different…

I came across a comic strip on my news feed on Facebook. It’s almost ironic and bittersweet that we find information that tells us exactly what’s wrong with us, using some of the same tools that are the cause of what’s wrong with us.

This is a social commentary. One on our use of social networks as a means of affirmation that generations before us didn’t need. At least not to the massive scale we need it. It challenges the idea that we have not matured even as people because of our need for constant communication and affirmation. A social trend even I, an individual who enjoys researching and continually combating such behavior, has to admit I fall prey to.

Why?

Because its socially acceptable.

The issues social networks present are astounding. It seems for every single effort a programmer and idea caster bring to fruition, there are at least 10 problems that present themselves that are never foreseen. Users are becoming users and abusers. Privacy becomes publicity. The world gets smaller, and everything becomes personal.

Why?

Because now we can.

I encourage you to check out the comic strip link above.


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